Author Topic: SGP: Report - Binary Data  (Read 4402 times)

Dunder Moose

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Re: SGP: Report - Binary Data
« Reply #15 on: October 27, 2009, 23:56:37 »
So I typed in all of the J signs from theBruce's image and got this.  The differences are noted in red. In other words, if two of them agreed I left it black, the odd one out got red.  Below I compared all the first lines, all the second lines, third and fourth.  Here is the result.  I am still playing with it, but hopefully posting these will make it easier to get some more brains on it. In all cases but one the second sign seemed to be the norm, that is, sharing the most symbols with the other two.

1011010110111101010111110110
1011011001100001101010110101
0001001010111100110011011110
1111111000101001101101101011

1011010110111101010111111010
1011111001101101101110110101
0101001011110000110011010110
0000011100101001100101101011

1010010110011101010100001010
1010111111011111111111111101
0100001011010100110011010110
0000011100001101100101101011

1st Lines
1011010110111101010111110110
1011010110111101010111111010
1010010110011101010100001010

2nd Lines
1011011001100001101010110101
1011111001101101101110110101
1010111111011111111111111101
 
3rd Lines
0001001010111100110011011110
0101001011110000110011010110
0100001011010100110011010110

4th Lines
1111111000101001101101101011
0000011100101001100101101011
0000011100001101100101101011
::0:-:-:0:-:0:0:0:-:000000:-:0000000:-:0000:00:0:0:0:00:00:000:0::

Omeganuepsilon

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Re: SGP: Report - Binary Data
« Reply #16 on: October 28, 2009, 05:02:06 »
Didn't realize there were 2 threads, check my post on the J signs topic.

I've not even been here in a while, and that's not liketly to change much...
I'll check in once in a while, but I'm actually having ....real life issues(keeping it generic as possible...not "I have mental issues" lol)... so I don't necessarily have the time or inclination to put any real effort into all this at the moment.

Good luck though, hope the convertors I posted turn out to be of some help, though there are so many possible ways to attempt to decode them, and the fact that all but one will just be jibberish being the BEST case scenerio....bleah.

ColdGlider

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Re: SGP: Report - Binary Data
« Reply #17 on: October 28, 2009, 15:36:26 »
The data doesn't seem representative of UTF-16, UTF-8, UTF-7, or ASCII when interpreted as binary either by assuming the dots to be 1s or 0s.  I've experimented some more with 7-bit bytes and still nothing.  I see the probability of a binary character encoding as even less now than I did initially.  The dots may encode characters, but perhaps using a different method.

Here is one method that could have been perfect if it actually worked (lol): Night Writing.  This was a predecessor of braille that, according to the linked Wikipedia article:
Quote
It was designed by Charles Barbier in response to Napoleon's demand for a code that soldiers could use to communicate silently and without light at night.
What better encoding for an ODST soldier to encounter at night?  The encoding requires two columns six-dots high in order to represent a single character.  Among the three J-banners we have 12 rows of 28 dots.  This could result in two rows of 14 characters in "Night Writing".  If only our data fit...

The thing about night writing is that the columns of dots are always contiguous; that is, there is never a need for there to be blanks between dots when scanning from top to bottom.  If you look at the three blocks of binary we have, you can see that there is no possible way to order them top-to-bottom such that you end up with two valid 6-dot "Night Writing" columns on top of one another in the resultant leftmost column of 12 dots.

So I have dropped that theory.

Then I looked at Polybius Squares.  This has merit, but what is our square and how is it encoded in the dots?  My initial mappings have failed.  Why would three dots in a column be expressed in multiple ways if the pattern wasn't significant?

This brought me back to the notion that the 4-dot columns encode either a number from 0-15 (or 1-16) or two numbers from 0-3 (or 1-4)... in binary.  So I'm back, full-circle, to binary... but then what? 

I really like Moose's idea of overlaying the data from the three banners, perhaps to construct a "fifth row".  We may also need to consider numbers we have seen elsewhere, such as the Optican Image.  Perhaps 49.2.7 plays in here somehow.  I had even considered that the barrier codes helped define a Polybius Square.  As always, I'm left with more questions than answers.

Back to the drawing board...
« Last Edit: August 16, 2012, 22:53:00 by nightcrafter27 »
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